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Home » What’s New » What You Need to Know About Firework Eye Safety

What You Need to Know About Firework Eye Safety

Independence Day may have passed but fireworks season is still in full swing and fireworks-related injury and death is a real and serious danger.  According to the 2014 Annual Fireworks Report, compiled by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission there were at least 11 deaths and 10,500 injuries due to fireworks last 

While the most common injuries occurred to the hands and fingers (approximately 36%), about 1 in every 5 of the injuries (19%) were to the eyes, where contusions, lacerations and foreign bodies in the eyes were the most common injuries. The danger to the eyes is serious and can result in permanent eye damage and loss of vision. Fireworks can rupture the globe of the eye or cause chemical and thermal burns, corneal abrasions and retinal detachment.

Sadly, children from 5-9 years of age had the highest estimated rate of emergency department-treated fireworks-related injuries (5.2 injuries per 100,000 people) and children under 15 years old accounted for 35% of the total injuries. Nearly half of those injured were bystanders and not actually handling the fireworks themselves. 

Here are Five Fireworks Safety Tips to enjoy fireworks safely:

  • The safest way to view fireworks is at a professional public display rather than at home use.
  • When viewing fireworks, carefully adhere to the safety barriers and view them from at least 500 feet away.
  • Never touch unexploded fireworks. Contact local fire or police departments immediately to deal with them.
  • Never let young children play with any type of fireworks even sparklers. 
  • In cases where consumer fireworks are legal, use them safely. Anyone that handles fireworks or is a bystander should wear proper protective gear and eyewear that meet national safety standards. 
  • Professional grade fireworks should only be handled by trained pyrotechnicians.

If a firework-related eye injury does occur, seek medical attention immediately. Try to leave the eye alone as much as possible; do not rub or rinse the eyes, apply pressure or try to remove an object that has entered the eye. 

In addition to knowing the dangers and safety precautions yourself, it’s important to teach your children about firework safety. Always remember that while they are fun to enjoy in the right setting, fireworks are explosive devices and should be treated as such. 

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We are taking every measure to assure the safety of patients, our doctors and our staff. We are closely monitoring and following guidance from the CDC and local health officials. We provide essential medical care and will remain open to care for our patients. Rest assured we have taken every precaution to prevent the spread of infectious disease in our offices.

In every office we continue to strictly adhere to hygiene and infection control protocols as we always have. We have reinforced staff training in basic and advanced hygiene and confirmed our cleaning and disinfection techniques are consistent with CDC recommendations.

We have increased our surveillance of patients who have scheduled appointments. All patient who receive patient appointment reminders are advised of the following:

If you returned from outside the U.S or visited an area defined by the CDC as an area of high risk IN THE LAST 14 DAYS, OR

If you had direct contact with an individual with confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19) IN THE LAST 14 DAYS, OR,

If you had direct contact with a person who is currently being quarantined for coronavirus (COVID-19) exposure IN THE LAST 14 DAYS, OR,

If you felt feverish and had a cough in the last 24 hours, please call our office to reschedule your appointment.

We are also confirming all appointments with a live phone call to further enhance our ability to identify patients at risk.

In addition, at the entrance of each office location we have posted a sign in English and Spanish repeating the message above.

Our computer based check in system once again queries each patient with the above questions.

All patients entering the office will have their body temperature measured with non-contact thermometers.

To the extent possible we will attempt to limit close contact between patients in the reception area by suggesting seating arrangements that avoid close contact.

Any patient who enters the office and is identified as at risk will be immediately masked and isolated while we contact the NJ Department of Health for further guidance. Our staff has been educated on this procedure and each office is supplied with appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) for our staff.

Our goal is to be diligent in protecting patients, doctors and staff from unnecessary exposure while continuing to provide them medical care they need.

This is a rapidly evolving situation and we will change our processes as necessary. We encourage you to adopt similar procedures in your own office and to stay well informed of recommendations from the CDC with respect to the COVID-19 Virus.