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Home » News » See Under the Sea & in the Swimming Pool Too

See Under the Sea & in the Swimming Pool Too

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Wear goggles for clear & healthy underwater vision

You don’t swim naked at a public beach or swimming pool, and you shouldn’t swim with naked eyes either! At the beach, it’s hard to know if ocean water is really clean and not polluted, and the sand and salt content can make your eyes sting. If you prefer swimming in a pool, remember that while pool water can be clean, that’s only because it’s packed with chlorine, which can seriously irritate your eyes, stripping away your lubricating film and causing redness, pain, and blurry vision.

Goggles are the ideal solution for protecting your delicate eyes against the harshness of water. Also, due to advanced materials and modern engineering of the lenses in swim goggles, they provide crisper underwater vision than ever before! Your knowledgeable Richboro eye doctor explains about the benefits and features of goggles:

Prescription goggles

If you normally need eyeglasses or contacts to see above water, our Richboro optometrist strongly recommends buying a pair of prescription goggles for underwater vision. For you to see, light rays reflect off an object, enter your eyes, and are focused on your retina clearly. However, light rays don’t function the same way when they are in water. That’s why the floor of a swimming pool appears higher up than it really is. In general, goggles correct this problem by creating an air-filled gap around your eyes. But this doesn’t give sharp sight to swimmers who need vision correction. If you have nearsightedness, farsightedness, or astigmatism, you’ll need prescription goggles to see.

Wearing contact lenses and standard goggles

A lot of people are in the habit of wearing standard goggles over their contact lenses, instead of purchasing a pair of prescription goggles. What’s the problem with this? Actually, water is the problem.

Water in all bodies – lakes, pools, oceans, and hot tubs – is a natural breeding ground for bacteria and microorganisms. While your body and your eyes have a built-in defense system to protect against these menacing microbes, contact lenses interfere with your eye’s protection. Consequently, swimming with contact lenses increases your risk of getting an eye infection.

Acanthamoeba keratitis is an extremely hazardous eye infection caused by amoeba being trapped between your contact lens and your cornea. Sometimes, amoeba start to live in your eye, leading to corneal ulcers and permanent vision loss. This type of infection only happens to people who wear contact lenses, which underscores our Richboro eye doctor’s warning against swimming with contacts!

Now, we also realize that many people will insist on wearing contact lenses at the beach or pool – despite all of our warnings. If you’re one of those people, here are some tips to help you minimize the danger to your eye health:

  • Wear daily disposable contacts for swimming, since you throw them out after a single use. Remove them immediately after you come out of the water, rinse your eyes with artificial tears and replace your lenses with a new, clean pair.
  • Even if you’re didn’t fully dip into the water, if any drops fall into your eyes, remove your contacts immediately and throw them out, or disinfect them if you aren’t wearing disposables.
  • Never open your eyes underwater
  • Never go swimming and then doze off on the shore or poolside with your lenses still in your eyes

Top features for goggles - recommended by our Richboro optometrist

  • Prescription lenses, if you generally need eyewear with vision correction
  • Shatterproof lenses
  • Anti-fog treatment
  • Leak-free lenses that seal comfortably around your eyes
  • Built-in UV protection
  • Surfers should wear polarized lenses to protect against reflected glare, which can be very intense on the water
  • Competitive swimmers and divers should choose frames with a low profile
  • Recreational lap swimmers do best with larger lenses (they give wider peripheral vision), and more padded frames

More questions about swimming and vision? Ask our Richboro eye doctor! 

Before you dive into the blue, sparkling waters at the beach or swimming pool, consult with an expert optometrist near you. We’ll help you find the safest way to have sharp underwater vision and a fabulous look! If you do experience irritated eyes, strange discharge, pain, sensitivity or redness after wearing your contact lenses while swimming, contact us immediately for an eye exam at Eye Associates of Richboro.

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We are taking every measure to assure the safety of patients, our doctors and our staff. We are closely monitoring and following guidance from the CDC and local health officials. We provide essential medical care and will remain open to care for our patients. Rest assured we have taken every precaution to prevent the spread of infectious disease in our offices.

In every office we continue to strictly adhere to hygiene and infection control protocols as we always have. We have reinforced staff training in basic and advanced hygiene and confirmed our cleaning and disinfection techniques are consistent with CDC recommendations.

We have increased our surveillance of patients who have scheduled appointments. All patient who receive patient appointment reminders are advised of the following:

If you returned from outside the U.S or visited an area defined by the CDC as an area of high risk IN THE LAST 14 DAYS, OR

If you had direct contact with an individual with confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19) IN THE LAST 14 DAYS, OR,

If you had direct contact with a person who is currently being quarantined for coronavirus (COVID-19) exposure IN THE LAST 14 DAYS, OR,

If you felt feverish and had a cough in the last 24 hours, please call our office to reschedule your appointment.

We are also confirming all appointments with a live phone call to further enhance our ability to identify patients at risk.

In addition, at the entrance of each office location we have posted a sign in English and Spanish repeating the message above.

Our computer based check in system once again queries each patient with the above questions.

All patients entering the office will have their body temperature measured with non-contact thermometers.

To the extent possible we will attempt to limit close contact between patients in the reception area by suggesting seating arrangements that avoid close contact.

Any patient who enters the office and is identified as at risk will be immediately masked and isolated while we contact the NJ Department of Health for further guidance. Our staff has been educated on this procedure and each office is supplied with appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) for our staff.

Our goal is to be diligent in protecting patients, doctors and staff from unnecessary exposure while continuing to provide them medical care they need.

This is a rapidly evolving situation and we will change our processes as necessary. We encourage you to adopt similar procedures in your own office and to stay well informed of recommendations from the CDC with respect to the COVID-19 Virus.