Skip to main content
Menu
Colorful20Rose20Water20Droplets201280x480_preview1.jpeg
Home » What’s New » Signs of Eye and Vision Problems in Infants

Signs of Eye and Vision Problems in Infants

Infant Eyesight

Despite nine months of growth in utero, babies are not born with fully developed eyes and vision - just like they can't walk or talk yet. Over the first few months of life, their visual systems continue to progress, stimulated by their surroundings.

Babies will develop the ability to track objects, focus their eyes, and move them like a team. Their visual acuity will improve and they will gradually be able to see more colors. They will also form the neural connections that will allow them to process what they see, to understand and interact with the world around them. 

Healthy eyes and good vision are necessary for proper and timely progress; ocular or visual problems can lead to developmental delays. 

So how do you know if your infant is developing normally? What can you do to ensure your baby's eye health and vision are on track? While infant eye problems are not common here are some steps you can take to ensure your child's eyes are healthy. 

#1 Schedule a six month check-up.

It is recommended to get the first professional comprehensive eye and vision exam for your child between six and 12 months of age. 

Your optometrist should check for the following skills at the 6-month checkup:

  • Visual acuity (nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism)
  • Eye muscle and movement capabilities
  • Eye health

If you have any concerns prior to six months, don't hesitate to take your baby for an exam earlier. 

#2 Engage in visually stimulating play.

Incorporating visually stimulating play for your child will help develop visual processes like eye tracking and eye teaming. 

A baby's initial focusing distance is 20-30 cm, so to nurture healthy vision skills, keep high contrast "reach and touch" toys within this distance. Alternate right and left sides with each feeding, and provide toys that encourage tracking of moving objects to foster eye-hand coordination and depth perception.

Pediatricians in North America recommend that NO screen time be allowed under the age of 2, as many forms of development may be delayed from premature use of digital devices. 

#3 Be alert to eye and vision problems.

Keep an eye out for indications of an eye health problem, and contact an eye doctor to discuss any concerns you may have. Some symptoms to pay attention to include:

  • Red eyes or eyelids, which may or may not be accompanied by discharge and crusty lids. This may indicate an eye infection that can be very contagious and may require medication. 
  • Excessive eye watering or tearing. This may be caused by a problem with the tear ducts, such as a blockage.
  • Extreme light sensitivity. While some light sensitivity is normal, significant sensitivity to light can be a sign of disease or elevated eye pressure. 
  • Eye “jiggling” or bouncing. This suggests a problem with the muscle control of the eyes.
  • Eye turn. Whether it is an eye that seems to cross in or a “lazy eye” that turns out, this is often associated with a refractive error or eye muscle issues that could require treatment such as eyeglasses, vision therapy, patching or surgery.
  • White pupil. This can be a sign of a number of diseases, including cancer. If you see this have it checked out immediately. 

Since your infant's eyes are still maturing, any issues that are found can likely be corrected with proper care and treatment. The important thing is to find a pediatric eye care provider that you trust because you will want to regularly check the health of your child's eyes to ensure proper learning and development throughout infancy and beyond.

x

We are taking every measure to assure the safety of patients, our doctors and our staff. We are closely monitoring and following guidance from the CDC and local health officials. We provide essential medical care and will remain open to care for our patients. Rest assured we have taken every precaution to prevent the spread of infectious disease in our offices.

In every office we continue to strictly adhere to hygiene and infection control protocols as we always have. We have reinforced staff training in basic and advanced hygiene and confirmed our cleaning and disinfection techniques are consistent with CDC recommendations.

We have increased our surveillance of patients who have scheduled appointments. All patient who receive patient appointment reminders are advised of the following:

If you returned from outside the U.S or visited an area defined by the CDC as an area of high risk IN THE LAST 14 DAYS, OR

If you had direct contact with an individual with confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19) IN THE LAST 14 DAYS, OR,

If you had direct contact with a person who is currently being quarantined for coronavirus (COVID-19) exposure IN THE LAST 14 DAYS, OR,

If you felt feverish and had a cough in the last 24 hours, please call our office to reschedule your appointment.

We are also confirming all appointments with a live phone call to further enhance our ability to identify patients at risk.

In addition, at the entrance of each office location we have posted a sign in English and Spanish repeating the message above.

Our computer based check in system once again queries each patient with the above questions.

All patients entering the office will have their body temperature measured with non-contact thermometers.

To the extent possible we will attempt to limit close contact between patients in the reception area by suggesting seating arrangements that avoid close contact.

Any patient who enters the office and is identified as at risk will be immediately masked and isolated while we contact the NJ Department of Health for further guidance. Our staff has been educated on this procedure and each office is supplied with appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) for our staff.

Our goal is to be diligent in protecting patients, doctors and staff from unnecessary exposure while continuing to provide them medical care they need.

This is a rapidly evolving situation and we will change our processes as necessary. We encourage you to adopt similar procedures in your own office and to stay well informed of recommendations from the CDC with respect to the COVID-19 Virus.